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FL Studio Tutorial - The Fruity Granulizer

Blckbxxx | 10:07 AM | 0 kommentarer

FL Studio tutorial explaining the Fruity Granulizer plugin.

Do you know that? When starting a new project you tend to follow the same route, use the same (VST) plugins, the same effects, the same stuff that you know how to operate. While this path of least resistance is often the easiest and quickest way to results, it has a drawback. You forget to explore unknown territory to develop new skills and insights. Changing your habits and leaving the road of least resistance may also help cure writer’s or composer’s block. We all suffer from that every now and then, trust me (especially the writer of this article, which would be me).

To make a long story short, I decided to take a detour and have a look at the Fruity Granulizer – a plugin I had ignored for a long time. That was a mistake. It has some really cool features, which I will explain you a bit about in this tutorial.

What does the Fruity Granulizer do?

The Fruity Granulizer slices samples into small pieces ('grains', hence the name Granulizer), allowing for pitch shifting and morphing your sounds.

Real time pitch shifting

What the Fruity Granulizer can do is shifting the pitch of a sample without changing the tempo (lengthen or shorten the sample). This is because the Granulizer applies a pitch shift algorithm to each grain individually. If the grains are played back with proper timing and in the right order, the length is unaffected yet the sound has changed pitch. To illustrate this I first droppped the vocal clip FLS_DontStopNow_02 onto the Step Sequencer. See below:

 

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You can find the vocal samples under Packs | Vocals in the Browser. Note that you can use another vocal sample if you do not happen to have the one I used. This does not affect the tutorial.

Now, if I play this sample at different pitches the length of the sample changes. Try this yourself either by hitting some keys on your keyboard (select the channel on the Step Sequencer first) or opening the Piano Roll and pressing keys on the keyboard. See below:

 

 

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Ok, let’s add the Fruity Granulizer:

 

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After I added it I just dropped the same vocal sample (FLS_DontStopNow_02) on top of this new channel. See below:

 

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If you select this channel and play the sample at different pitches you will notice that the length of the sample stays the same – yet the pitch has changed.

Note events

Another cool thing when using the Fruity Granulizer is that the sound plays for a duration that corresponds to the length of your note events. If you have an ordinary sampler channel, the entire vocal clip plays when you trigger it by a note event. This is not the case when using the Granulizer. Try making a note event pattern as shown below and I am sure you will appreciate this feature.

 

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Morphing samples

Most fun can be obtained by morphing your samples. First, let’s have a look at the Fruity Granulizer controls:

 

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Under the section Grains, you find the following controls: Att(ack), Hold, G(rain) Sp(ace) and W(ave) Sp(ace).

Let’s start with grain space and wave space. These 2 knobs operate very much in tandem, one controlling the space between grains (G. SP) and the other the width of each grain (W.SP). The smaller the value of the latter the more grains you will have. The smaller the value of the former the faster the grains will follow eachother (less space between grains). If both are set to the same value the length of the sample is unchanged.

If I for example reduce the wave space from 100% to 50% (this means I will have double the number of samples), but keep the distance between samples the same (grain space), I effectively double the length of the sample. See also the illustration below:

 

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In the first example the grain space and wave space are the same. The length of the sample will be unchanged. In the second example, the wave space has been cut in half, so now we have double the number of samples, but because the grain space is unchanged the length of the sample has been doubled. In the last example, the opposite happened as the grain space was reduced relative to the wave space. This compresses the length of the sample.

As usual, the best way to grasp this is by playing around with it. Load a sample of your own and start turning those knobs! Don’t forget to turn Att(ack) and Hold as well. With those you can affect the attack and length of grains respectively.

With the 4 buttons, you can achieve some amazing effects.

Effects

As if the previous 4 buttons weren’t enough, you also have an effects section. I am not going too much in detail, but quote from the FL Studio help file:

  • Stereo Separation wheel (PAN) - The more you turn it to right, the more even grains are panned to right, and odd ones panned to left. To disable the effect, turn the wheel maximum to left.
  • Effect Depth wheel (FX.D) - This setting determines the amplitude of the LFO applied to the wave spacing value. Turn to right to increase the amplitude. To turn the LFO off, turn the wheel maximum to left.
  • Effect Speed wheel (FX.S) - This wheel determines the speed of the LFO applied to the wave spacing value. Turning to right makes the LFO faster, while turning it to left makes it slower.
  • Randomness wheel (RAND) - Applies randomness to grain playback. Turn the wheel to right to increase the effect. To disable the effect, turn it maximum to left.

Key to feature

A very handy feature is the Key to feature in the Time section. Try setting this to Percent as shown below:

 

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What this does is that the keys C5-C7 will correspond to 0-100% of the sample. It simply allows you to start at different positions in the sample. Now, this opens up some possibilities of its own doesn’t it?

For example, imagine you loaded a long sample (e.g., ‘I love you baby, won’t you come home with me tonight’ – hmmm I guess you figured out what’s on my mind right now). By using the the Key to Percent feature (and different note event lengths), you can simply play different parts of this sample (by using different keys). I haven’t actually tried this myself, but it seems to me that it is an alternative to creating different samples. And then you can morph every piece individually – e.g. using automation? Wow, the sky seems the limit.

 

I hope this tutorial was helpful for you and has given you some inspiration for exploring this versatile plugin. More in general, I hope it has shown you that leaving the path of least resistance can lead to nice discoveries :) Happy composing!

Support Forbidden Fruity. Buy the PDF with this tutorial for only US$ 0.99:

 

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FL Studio Tutorials - All fl studio tutorials are written by Marc Demar

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